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Into the light

Morning Sunrise on the Apache Trail

You know me…a hint of weather, a mention of rain…and I can suddenly feel the juices get flowing again. When I go weeks and weeks at a time with nothing but blue, sunny skies…I kind of forget how much I love being out there chasing storms.

Monday was a day off for me…I wanted a nice little three-day weekend before I start my new job today. As amazing luck would have it (or maybe a nice little gift from the man upstairs), we actually had a storm system blow through the state that morning and afternoon. Clear skies today and the rest of the week…clear skies before that…but somehow…storms on Monday…my day off.

I was pumped.

Now, they weren’t storms that I normally love to get after…lightning, towering clouds…but it’s weather alright? I take what I can get!

I decided to get up at the crack of dawn and make my way to the Superstition Mountains before sunrise to see what I would so. It was a beautiful morning…standing outside in 35 degrees, watching the sun rise and light up the morning clouds.

This was actually the last shot of the day…taken around 9am. As it usually happens when I’m out doing this stuff, I didn’t plan this shot, nor stop to get it. I did stop to climb the hill to take some pictures of a forest of Ocotillo cactus, and on my way down I realized how much of the road I could see disappearing into the distance and then the sun started creating awesome rays from behind the clouds.

That’s my favorite part of stormchasing really. Never knowing what you’ll find when you are out there, nor what shots you’ll get. It’s a matter of exploring, looking, observing and getting lucky.

Now we return you to your regularly blue skies…already in progress (ugh).

(exif: 5d mark ii, tamron 17-35 2.8, 17mm,  f/16, iso100)

Monsoon chasing on the Apache Trail

This is a little bit of an older shot taken about a month ago in July. I really wanted to post the sunset photo from last night, but I’m having trouble with getting the colors to show up correctly once I upload them to the web, so I’m not sure what’s going on there. Any help or advice would be appreciated.

I took this photo on the Apache Trail road when I was out stormchasing with my buddy Brian. I thought the powerlines would ruin the shot, but for some reason I like them, along with the road of course. Have you not yet realized my love for those double-yellow lines disappearing down black asphalt paths?

I mainly took this because of the monsoon cloud off in the distance…it had a cool look to it, was more dreamy than scary and it had a little bit of rain falling from the bottom.

Wandering with the Arizona monsoon: On the Apache Trail

What’s amazing about Phoenix is that stuff like this can be seen on just a short drive east of town. Now, it’s not Grand Falls or anything spectacular in the sense of landmarks or stunning vistas…but if you take the time to stop, get out of the car, walk down a short path and look around…you can see beautiful scenes everywhere.

This was a short distance from a pull-off on Apache Trail, a road that takes you to Canyon Lake and eventually Roosevelt Lake. My buddy Bryan (Whom I made famous yesterday) and I made all kinds of stops along the way to Canyon Lake to snap photos of the desert landscapes mixed with the monsoon clouds of the afternoon.

That was essentially the goal of the summer and my “wanderings with the Arizona monsoon.” This coming week I’m headed further northeast into the pine trees for a little camping and hope to get a different angle on the monsoons with the evergreens and mountain lakes.

Definitely click on the larger version of the photo because I think it actually looks a little sharper than the scaled down image above.

Canyon Lake Monsoon Panoramic

Sometimes it’s hard to capture all the detail you want in a single image, so you have to go for the panoramic. I definitely recommend clicking on the photo to see the larger version. This picture is from my recent stormchasing adventure with my buddy Bryan. We drove down Apache Trail towards Canyon Lake and stopped just a little short of it to climb to the top of this hill to see what we could see.

Yes, I’ll verify that Bryan warned me that we were watching an approaching monsoon thunderstorm and the hill we chose to shoot from also had a couple of giant supports for powerlines on it, but that’s for the faint of heart to worry about!

What we loved about this spot was the color of the hills in contrast to stormy skies in the background. The sunlight from behind us still shown a little on them and it made for an awesome sight. You can see Canyon Lake on the left, with a massive downpour behind it. Some more rain is falling just behind the hills in the center of the photo, and the entire storm was moving slowly towards us.

By the time we climbed down and drove a little more, it started pouring pretty good.

Those hills and mountains around the Superstitions really created some amazing vistas to use when photographing our beautiful monsoons season here in Arizona. Hoping to get out there again sometime soon.

For those interested, this is a merge of three HDR shots created from three-bracketed images each.