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Ocean of Fire

A stunning, out of control monsoon sunset west of Gila Bend near the Paloma Dairy

Back in 2015 west of Gila Bend, near the Paloma Dairy I saw one of the most extraordinary sunsets I’ve ever witnessed during the monsoon. Dust was blowing across the ground. The sky lit up in all shades of orange. Lightning in the distance. It was astounding.

Ended up being a beautiful time-lapse! But here’s a frame from that time-lapse, complete with a nice little lightning bolt to top off a gorgeous scene.

Bubbles III

With light waning in the day and not wanting to chase tornadoes in the dark, we decided to sit and watch this incredibly peaceful scene of mammatus clouds moving away from us over the Kansas prairie.

May 24th of last year was an amazing chase day. Last week I posted some supercell photos from earlier in the afternoon and this was one of the final scenes of the day. We knew there was a potential for tornadoes east of us but chasing in the dark and catching up with them seemed impossible, so we say back and took in this breathtaking scene. I’d never seen mammatus like this in person before and it was incredible to behold. The day was almost over, but we still had an awesome lightning storm headed our way that we’d enjoy for a few more hours yet!

The Crossing

A ragged shelf cloud rolls across western Nebraska on June 2nd, bringing heavy rain behind it.

Those days when you try and try and try to see a supercell but nothing goes up near you and so you try to salvage the day by at least getting a nice shelf cloud in western Nebraska.

June 2nd, 2015…standing here right next to my buddy Matt Grans and his friend Nancee Rostad…this was a perfect moment with zero traffic on the road and a nice little shelf cloud crossing in front of us. Rare to get a time-lapse of something like this from right in the middle of a road and no cars come by…sometimes you risk it and hope for the best!

Star Wars

A few days ago I decided to get some buddies together to go shoot the Geminid Meteors for the peak of the shower Sunday into Monday. We met up in Organ Pipe in far southern Arizona and enjoyed some dark skies and one of the most active meteor showers I've ever seen! Got home and took this morning to put this image together...it's a stack/blend of about 25 meteors put into one photo. This is part of a time-lapse sequence as well, shot at f/2.8, 20 seconds and ISO 5000.

I heard about the Geminid Meteors being at their peak Sunday into Monday, so I called around to a few buddies this weekend in an effort to drag them out with me somewhere remote so I’d have a few meat shields in case of attack from crazy peeps. We decided to do Organ Pipe south of Ajo since Greg McCown lives in Tucson and it was sorta central for us. Keith Kessler and Davo Laninga, who took my Monsoon workshop a few years ago, also joined me! So great to hang with these dudes. Organ Pipe is stunning. Saguaro everywhere. We got there and meteors were all over the place in most directions. It was nuts. But at first the cameras just weren’t picking them them, so I got discouraged. Still, I cranked the ISO to 5000 and we sat in the truck with the heat blasting for a couple of hours…and when stopped my little time-lapse, I found all these crazy meteors scattered throughout the photos.

Here’s a stacked photo of a bunch of images amounting to roughly 25 meteors. This isn’t anything new, I’ve seen lots of stacked meteor shots and I wanted to give it a shot. I love the way it turned out, but hope to get more practice down the road. I just learned some new techniques for noise and editing of Milky Way shots, hoping to up my game down the road…but for now, hope you enjoy!

The Vacuum

This incredibly photogenic storm near Booker, Texas was like a dust-eating machine. Everything around it seemed to get sucked into the updraft of this stunning supercell. The colors at sunset added to the apocalyptic look of this storm.

Amazingly, I still have some photos from this Booker, TX storm back in 2013 that I never actually processed…so last night I got motivated to edit this one! It’s one of the best storms I’ve ever seen, and my buddy Andy Hoeland and I still can’t believe we were there to witness this amazing supercell.

West of Tonopah

I was in Avondale when storms looked to be dying out, but way out west I thought I saw a base just hanging out there...so I went for it. Finally as we neared Tonopah the cloud tops went up and the bolts started raining down. One of the most incredible lightning shows I've seen. Lasted for 45 minutes, created strong dusty outflow and had some amazing colors.
(please click to view on black // canon 5d mark ii, rokinon 14mm f/2.8, iso 400, f/5.6, 3.2 sec // buy print)

**You can use coupon codex “chase2015” for 25% off prints all summer long**

One of those times you drive towards a storm base without much hope, and then it explodes to 40k ft right at sunset and you witness an incredible lightning show for 45 minutes. Shot this west of Phoenix near the town of Tonopah a few nights ago.

This is a frame from a 352-image time-lapse…gotta be one of the best lightning time-lapses I’ve shot. So many CG’s for the life of this storm that lasted almost 45 minutes. Plus the colors, a huge dust outflow…was amazing.

Got tons of shots with the 50mm too, can’t wait to share some! Probably will save the time-lapse itself for when Monsoon II comes out

Artesia II

A beautiful supercell rotates over the deserts southwest of Artesia, New Mexico.
(please click to view on black // canon 5d mark iii, rokinon 14mm f/2.8, iso 100, f/8, 1/60th // buy print)

Here’s a shot from May 23rd, 2014 that I never edited. Taken southwest of Artesia, New Mexico. We had been striking out on solid supercell structure the first few days of our chase trip, so this gorgeous little LP storm had us jumping up and down.

Headed back to the plains Friday night…cannot wait.

Across the Sky

A lightning bolt seems to travel all the way across the sky and slams into the ground near Goodland, Kansas on April 15th, 2015. In reality this may have been a few different strikes unrelated to each other, but it's hard to tell. In the middle of the photo right on the horizon is a supercell and a small wall cloud that spawned a funnel cloud a bit later.

A lightning bolt seems to travel all the way across the sky and slams into the ground near Goodland, Kansas on April 15th, 2015. In reality this may have been a few different strikes unrelated to each other, but it’s hard to tell. In the middle of the photo right on the horizon is a supercell and a small wall cloud that spawned a funnel cloud a bit later.

Headed out to the plains in three days! Cannot wait!

 

The Alanreed Supercell

Alanreed Supercell
(please click to view on black // canon 5d mark iii, rokinon 14mm f/2.8, iso 100, f/8, 1/40th // buy print)

Storm chasing can be frustrating and fruitless. Or it can be magnificent and incredibly rewarding. On April 16th of this year, I was able to chase solid structure for almost six hours. So many time-lapses and photos. It was just one of those days that keeps you coming back for more.

This storm earlier spawned a brief tornado near Groom, Texas. It moved to the east/northeast across the rolling farmlands…I caught up to it once again here just north of Alanreed. The hail core and structure was gorgeous. After the clouds nearly passed over me, I got back south and blasted east to chase it again.

More to come!

Let’s go places

Let's go places
(please click to view on black // canon 5d mark iii, rokinon 14mm f/2.8, ISO 3200, f/2.8, 20 seconds // buy print)

Last Tuesday I left my house around 4pm for Colorado and two days of chasing storms. Around 3 in the morning I couldn’t go any further, so I pulled over at a parking area north of Las Vegas, New Mexico to grab a few hours sleep.

A perfect spot to grab a shot of Vera II against the Milky Way. Loved how dark it was here…not to mention open and flat. Standing there, seeing the stars blaze in the sky like you don’t usually living in a big city…is always awe-inspiring.