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A lightning photography tutorial

(exif: canon eos 5d mark ii, canon 85mm 1.8, iso 100, f/7.1, 30 sec – Click for a larger view – Taken this summer in Arizona)

Whenever I post lightning photos, I usually get a few questions about HOW I shoot them. What’s most surprising though are the ones I get from fellow photographers. In the last few days I’ve received a few questions that can basically be summed up like this:

“How do you get the timing right?”

The other one I get is whether or not I used a lightning trigger. I’ll address that later in this post.

I’m not mentioning this as a way to belittle those photogs with that question. I guess I just assumed that everyone that has a DSLR would know how to shoot lightning. I mean, the reason I bought my first one was BECAUSE of what it could do for me when it came to photographing lightning. Obviously I’m realizing now that it’s not something that everyone readily knows and so I figured I’d write up a little lightning photography tutorial on how I get my shots.

Let’s get started.

Opening Statement

I figured I would just start with this: The hardest part isn’t the timing. Timing doesn’t matter (mostly).

The hardest part is finding the lightning.

What You Need

My first lightning photos were captured using a Point & Shoot that could take 3 shots a second. I put it on a tripod and held the shutter button down. It would take about 100 photos before it quit and I had to re-press the shutter. The timing was everything on this because lightning can take place faster than quarter second and you can miss it easily.

Or you can miss the beginning of the strike. Or the end. You want all of it. I want all of it. Look at the photo at the top of this post.

You can shoot that way if you want, but if you are serious about lightning photography, you have to lose that crutch of “timing.”

Equipment list:

  • A DSLR camera
  • Tripod
  • External shutter release
  • Extra batteries
  • Ability to shoot wide or zoomed
  • Umbrella (or something to keep your camera dry if you can)
  • A healthy fear of lightning
  • Luck

Your camera should have a Bulb mode or at least the ability to shoot up to 30-second exposures. Most do, but just make sure  your camera’s shutter can be triggered using a remote shutter release.

Shutter releases can come in a few styles. There are simple manual releases, like this one from Canon. Or ones that allow you to sit back and relax while your camera does the work, like this one.

Lenses are important. Sometimes a wide angle is great, but it also means you are practically right under the lightning which isn’t always a good idea. With my full-frame Mark II, I’d rather use either my 50mm 1.4 or 85mm 1.8. The photo at the top of this tutorial was with the 85mm. It allow you to to zoom into a storm that isn’t right on top of you. Prime lenses are also super-sharp and seem to give the best results.

What I’d really love of course would be a 70-200 for lightning because you can cover a ton of ground with that thing. I still love my primes though.

One of the reasons I like to use a wide angle from time to time is when I want to get the scope of a thunderstorm along with some lightning, instead of the lightning being the main focal point.

Settings and Whatnot

You see lightning a few miles away, it’s dark out, so you pull off into a nice, open area…take out the camera, mount it on your tripod and now want to shoot some lightning. What do you do?

Here are the steps I tend to go through:

  1. Plug in my shutter release
  2. Put the camera in Manual or Bulb
  3. ISO to 100
  4. Aperture to f/5.0 or greater
  5. Shutter speed to 15 seconds (or skip this in bulb mode)
  6. Aim towards the lightning
  7. Fire off a practice shot

This stuff can vary of course. If it’s still dusk out, I’ll put my aperture to the smallest it can go (like f/22 or something) and perhaps even put a CPL filter or an ND filter to help stop down the light a bit.  It just depends on what you are doing or the situation you are in.

But if it’s dark out, the above settings are a good starting point. If your practice shot is too bright, increase your F-stop or shorten your exposure.

Aperture and ISO

Two very important aspects of your shot are the settings of the aperture and ISO. I’ll just talk briefly about what they do for you and why you want them where they are.

ISO is always, ideally, at 100. Especially at night when you have a dark sky and bright lightning. Bumping it to ISO 800 would only end up causing overexposure. During the daytimes (as you can see from some shots at the bottom of this tutorial), sometimes you may up the ISO because you want to be a bit more sensitive to that light.

Aperture. The wider your aperture, the more overexposed your shot will end up being. Hence you really never want to get much wider than F/5. The closer the lightning gets to you, the higher your F-stop should go. It doesn’t ALWAYS have to change, but it’s just a guide more than a rule.

The Long Exposure

So the way to counteract the “timing” issue it to negate it entirely by using long exposures. Yes, there are lightning triggers out there, but I really don’t see why you’d use them at night (which I hear some people actually do). During the day, yes, that makes total and complete sense. But I still don’t think a lightning trigger is fast enough to capture the entire strike.

I’d never use a lightning trigger at night. Baffles me.

The long exposure is the way to go. Depending on your camera, there are a few ways you can go about doing this.

My old Rebel XSi could do Bulb mode (of course) so I used my manual cable release to hold open my shutter until I saw a lightning strike. This is a good way to start. You hold it open…wait for the strike and then choose to release the shutter or hope for another strike.  I’d normally not go more than 30 seconds without a strike before releasing and then shooting another shot. The longer it’s open, the more noise, the more cloud movement, etc.

The problem of course is if you miss a strike during that brief 1-2 seconds between close and open again. It’s a killer when you miss a strike because of that and I’ve let out a few curses when it’s happened.

Now, my 5D Mark II has a cool feature. I can set the camera up in Manual mode for a 10-second exposure and then on my cable shutter release, put it in locked mode so it’s continually pushed down and then just let it go. The camera will just keep firing 10 second exposures as long as that shutter release is held down. Sit back, relax. My Rebel wouldn’t do this. So Bulb mode was the only way to go.

If you have a fancier shutter release that has the timer built in, you can program it to shoot say a 10-second exposure every 10 seconds and that should work even on the Rebel. However, programming one of those things out in the darkness, during a storm, when you are in a big hurry is a royal PAIN. It’s so much easier to change the shutter speed or to just do Bulb mode.

Bulb Mode or Manual

So what’s the better mode to shoot in? And why?

It basically depends on what you are going for.

Manual mode allows you full control. If you want, you can do as short as two seconds or five minutes. It’s up to you. If you are shooting in manual and set for say, 10 seconds, you are stuck with that until you change it. You have no control mid-shot.

Why does full control matter? Well, let’s say you have an awesome storm going on. Strikes are going nuts. With Bulb mode you can leave the shutter open as long as you feel necessary to capture as many strikes as you can in one shot. Sometimes you are just going for one. Other times you can get 2, 3 or more in a short timespan. Bulb mode let’s you control that better.

(There are people that like to combine multiple lightning strike shots into a single image…I don’t like to do that. I’d rather capture it in a longer exposure.)

Manual mode is nice if you don’t care that much. You can aim the camera at a spot, set it for 30 seconds, lock the shutter release down and sit back. I like this mode for safety purposes because I can setup the camera outside my car and then hide inside to avoid getting struck by a bolt.

This past week while in Memphis I put it outside under a patio umbrella and let it fire off into the night sky while I sat inside watching TV.

Focusing and Live Mode

You’d never think about it, but focusing is one of those things that can bite you in the ass when you are shooting lightning. It’s of the upmost importance to get a clear, crisp strike. Focus can also be difficult when you are in the middle of nowhere in the darkness. What do you focus on?

Your best bet is distant city lights. What you can do if you want is to shoot in Live Mode, find some lights, zoom into them and manually focus until they are sharp. I’ve also used stars or the moon. If all else fails, you can also just set your lens to the infinity focus line and hope for the best!

Live Mode is also a good idea on some cameras because it keeps your mirror locked up and quickens the speed of your next exposure. I pretty much use it 100% of the time.

A note about Infinity on your focus ring: If your aperture is set at 5.6 and you use the Infinity line to focus, instead of doing an auto focus on something on the horizon, like city lights, etc, you could end up with blurring lightning. Because the aperture is so wide open, being off even by just a hair on the Infinity line can screw you.

Hence the need to have extra batteries!

(UPDATE: Forgot to include this: Once you get your lens focused,  switch it on MANUAL FOCUS. If you have it on Auto, it may try to focus on the dark for the next shot and mess up all your images! Manual focus! A better method for this is to get your camera setup for “Back Button Focus”, which you can Google. I highly recommend this as something you should just do anyways)

The Chase and Luck

Back to my original statement up top: The toughest part of shooting lightning is actually finding lightning.

It has to be one of the most frustrating things to photograph. Sometimes it can be like shooting fish in a barrel and sometimes you drive hundreds of miles in a day to chase it down only to miss it and see it’s behind you now and you gotta drive THAT way, and you are getting tired, it’s late (or early, who knows) and you are mad, annoyed and running out of gas and patience. You gotta get lucky sometimes.

But it’s like anything that’s elusive and hard to find: Once you have it in your hands, it’s exhilarating.

The key is to put yourself in a good spot to shoot it. If it’s your home area, know the high points, where cool things are, how the storms usually operate and move and slowly understand/predict where they will end up. Watch the radar, pay attention to where the storms are and where they are likely to be later that day. Learn how they develop.

A big thing I do is to bring along my laptop, an internet connection and watch the radar. It’s a HUGE help if you are suddenly unsure where to go next.

The shooting part isn’t that tough really.

Wherever you pull over, just judge how far away the strikes are and choose a good lens. Normally you want that strike to fill the frame. Take a practice shot or two and see how your sky and clouds look. If they are acceptable, then go ahead with your Manual or Bulb method and shoot until you capture a strike.

Try to avoid the desire to stop shooting and hit the “Play” button to look back at a strike. I do this all the time, but it can cause you to miss another one. Just know it’s going to be on that card the rest of the night and you can look later! The only reason to look would be to make sure your exposure looks okay.

Composition

I know it may seem funny, but composition is still key to a good lightning photo. It’s not completely about just aiming and capturing a strike.

Most of the time at night you’ll be ending up with foreground silhouettes. so try to frame them according to your good senses. I like to have these elements in my shots because without them, a lightning strike has no scale or scope. Sometimes a strike disappearing behind a tree is awesome. A lone silhouette of a cactus can be sweet with a giant strike behind it. Usually you are in such a hurry it’s tough, but do your best to find cool things to frame in your shot. Powerlines or a towering radio antenna can be fun. Lightning reflections in puddles of water are awesome if you can find them.

Another discipline to have is the ability to toss out subpar strikes. Just because you got a shot with lightning in it doesn’t mean it’s good. Some strikes are just boring and weak. The best ones have interesting curves, twists, or are giant explosions of trails going everywhere. Use your own judgment, but try to be okay with some shots not making the cut.

Dust, Wind and Rain

Three natural elements that make things tough are dust, wind and rain. Nothing can frustrate you more than knowing you have some awesome lightning going on and there is too much rain, wind or dust blowing around.

To combat the wind, I usually take off the camera strap before leaving the house. When you are out in the field trying to shoot and there is so much wind you are worried about camera shake during your 30-second exposure, look for ways to shield the camera. Drop the tripod closer to the ground, use your car as a buffer, whatever.

Rain is tough. A few sprinkles can be dealt with, but if it gets heavier, you gotta bail. Rain spot on a lens can totally ruin a lightning strike. If you aren’t super-close to the lightning, you can use an umbrella a little bit to shield the camera. I’ve also used my body or just a hand above the lens. If you use a 50mm or 85mm that have nice, deep lens hoods, that helps too!

My buddy Shane Kirk taught me a sweet method for shooting in pouring rain that worked for me last year: Put your camera on a tripod or on the dashboard of your car and put the wipers on. You’ll never see the wipers and you’ll still get some good shots. It’s key though to find a spot without lights anywhere, because they’ll reflect off the brief water spots and could cause some issues. The closer your camera is to the windshield, the better.

Also, now that I have the 4Runner this year, I plan on shooting out the back whilst sitting inside to avoid the rain. We’ll see how that works.

Dust is dust…but I figure I can always get my camera cleaned right? I’m brutal on my equipment during a stormchase.

Safety and Stuff

This may not be evident, but I’m sort of terrified of lightning. If it’s super-close to where I am, I’ll stop watching the storm from the patio and hang inside. I have no desire to get struck.

So being out there shooting the stuff in the middle of storms is kind of crazy for me. I’m super-excited to be doing it, but I’ll also cower in the car while holding my shutter release.

This is a good thing though. You should be afraid of lightning. It can kill you. This fear will keep you safe while you are out there. It will stop you from running to the top of a hill in the middle of a storm, becoming the tallest object around. And while you are standing there, it starts to rain so you pull out your handy-dandy metal umbrella and now you are a sitting duck.

If I see a lightning strike suddenly appear over my head, it’s time to get in the car.

While you are in the act of shooting, watch the sky. Don’t completely focus just on where your camera is pointed, because it is ALREADY looking that way and will capture the lightning for you. Keep a look-out for stuff developing around you and behind you and above you. Not only will this keep you safe but it will also alert you to a better shooting option.

Also, pull off the side of roads as far as you can. You don’t want a semi crushing you into oblivion. It’s always best to find a safe pull-out, dirt road, parking lot, etc.

Post-Processing

Tweaking your lightning strike images can turn them from being just okay to being awesome.  Lightroom or Adobe Camera Raw has some great ways to play with your exposure to get it perfect. Lowering the exposure, upping contrast, fill light, blacks, saturation, etc…all of it can greatly enhance your final product. I also play with filters in Photoshop, like Phototools or Nik.

Depending on the ISO you used or how good your camera is, you may need to do some noise reduction, or clean up dust spots.

Cropping is a huge thing. You may have framed it well, but suddenly the strike is in the lower right corner. Try to crop the image to get the strike to fill more of the frame if the rest of the shot is boring.

Conclusion

Lightning photography is amazingly fun and can also be amazingly frustrating. It’s a euphoric feeling to look back at your shots and see a huge strike captured. You’ll also want to cry when you wasted a tank of gas, got home at 3am only to work the next day and didn’t capture a single strike.

I’m still learning. Heck, a few days ago I discovered how great the 85mm 1.8 is for doing this. There are always better ways to do things. The key is to practice. You can read my tutorial, or someone else’s, but until you get out there and do it, you aren’t really gonna know what’s going to work and what wont.

Have fun with it, be safe and please ask me any questions you want about what I do. I’ll gladly answer and do whatever I can to help you out.

For those in Arizona, I’m planning on doing some On-Call Stormchasing Trips this summer where you can ride along with me and hopefully we’ll shoot together and learn together. More to come on that.

I’ll leave you with a few of my favorite shots from last year and some of the EXIF info on them.

Lighting Photo Arizona

(exif: 55mm, iso 400, f/29, 9.0 sec – dusk settings. Not sure if I put an ND or CPL on for this or not…probably)


(exif: 17mm, iso 250, f/10, 6 sec)

Lightning Sunset in Tucson

(exif: 18mm, iso 250, f/22, 6.0 seconds – Narrow aperture, but higher ISO to be more sensitive to the light)

Lighting Photo Arizona

(This was the dashboard shot from last year – 28mm, iso 100, f/5.6, 9.0 sec – probably should have upped the F-stop on this, it’s pretty over-exposed. But it was less than 1/4 mile away anyways!)

Symmetry - Arizona Monsoon Lightning

(exif: 70-210mm f/4, 205mm, f/5.6, iso 400, 30 sec)

First lightning of the year

Lightning strikes in Memphis

I knew it would work out this way. After spending three days driving 2200 miles stormchasing the midwest…and getting essentially nothing…all it took was a vacation to Memphis and standing outside on the patio to get my first real lightning shots of the season. I did get a few in Nebraska two weeks ago, but they were from pretty far away and don’t really measure up to my standards *tee hee*

I actually did take my bro-in-law’s car and drove about 1/4 mile down the road to a more open area to get the shot above, but most of the stuff just came over the house for 2-3 hours and it was easy pickin’s.

One thing I did learn last night: I love my Canon 85mm 1.8 lens for shooting lightning. The photo above was with that lens and it’s uncropped. If you zoom into the full-sized version, you can see even more lightning trails. LOVE IT. Clear, crisp…wonderful. Can’t wait to use it this monsoon season.

As always, you can click on the image to see it larger!

(exif above: canon eos 5d mark ii, canon 85mm 1.8, f/5, iso 100, 25 sec)

(exif below: canon eos 5d mark ii, tamron 17-35mm 2.8, 17mm, f/5, iso 100, 20 sec)


 

Figures

A Nebraska supercell after dark

Nebraska supercell after dark

(Click to enjoy the storm a little bigger, almost like you were there. Okay, not really)

Whew. It’s around 9am right now and I just landed in Phoenix a bit after 7am after flying out from Oklahoma City this morning. A long trip, I added around 2200 miles to the lovely Hyundai Santa Fe I rented and slept in the car two of the three nights for a total of five hours. I did actually rent a hotel on Tuesday night and it was some of the best sleep I’ve had in awhile.

The bottom line from the trip was that I didn’t really see what I wanted to see. I was hoping for beautiful, isolated supercells with gorgeous cloud structure. Ehhh…not this time. That’s okay though…I had a blast, got to spend a day with an awesome stormchasing photographer named Shane Kirk that I’d never met in person before and I saw so many beautiful places I’d never seen before.

I have a ton of stories, and a video I’ll be putting together of my few adventures…but right now I’ll talk quickly about the photo above.

The photo above was taken in the NW corner of Nebraska on Monday night. The beautiful storm clouds you see in this shot had just passed over this road from the left side. This was a fairly intense supercell that was tornado warned and had a vortex signature on it. The fun part was I had come down this road doing about 95mph so I could not be slaughtered by the thing. Basically it was akin to walking really slow across some railroad tracks as a massive locomotive comes barreling down at you. The train barely misses you, but you get slammed with all the wind anyways.

As I was coming down the road at one point, I thought I saw stuff blowing across the road up ahead and figured it was a funnel and I was screwed. But it was just some nasty RFD (rear flank downdraft) that rocked my car all over the place.

When I finally got to a safe spot, I turned around and aimed my camera at this cell. It was just gorgeous. The photo can’t do it justice. The thing was flashing non-stop and it was something to behold.

I have a few more lightning shots I may post down the road, but this was one of my favs. The first good shot on a crazy stormchasing trip.

(exif: canon eos 5d mark ii, tamron 17-35mm 2.8, 17mm, f/5.6, iso 200, 8 sec)

October Monsoon Storm Photos: Part 1

Two weeks ago Arizona was lambasted with severe weather over the course of 2-3 days. Heavy rains, hail, dented cars, tornadoes, damage to homes and property. None of that happened to me, but I certainly enjoyed chasing it all!

The first two photos are from the 4th of October where we just had some heavy rains, nothing too horrible. But after that the fun really began.

I mentioned this before on another post, but I love weather photos in general and sometimes I just like to remember a scene regardless of where I was standing or what kind of crappy composition I had going on. I process them afterwards to highlight the clouds and storminess, but for the most part, I don’t share these with intentions of selling them. Sure, if you want to buy one PLEASE do, but otherwise, these are all for fun (even if 1-2 might make it on my coming soon photobook).

The next few below were taken on October 5th along Interstate 8 between Gila Bend and Casa Grande. Some massive storms, some of them supercell in nature, were raining heck down on the freeway and I raced there to capture some of the madness.

The next few below look like wall clouds from a supercell and they MAY or MAY NOT have been that…I was so consumed at the time with my lightning trigger I totally forgot to look for rotation. That’s how much of an Arizona boy I am…pathetic if you ask me.

I LOVE these shots…menacing, dark, spooky…and the third one actually has a lightning strike in it captured with the trigger!

This next one was heading back towards Maricopa…a spectacular hail/rain storm.

This one below is just east of Queen Creek and I-10.

The last two are along highway 587 and I shot them with my buddy Bryan, the only person I know who will actually join me stormchasing and be as excited as I am.

The structure on this last one was awesome. A slight tint of blue inside that storm indicating hail.

Brain Lightning

I love weather, I love chasing storms and I absolutely LOVE the challenge of photographing lightning. There is definitely a love/hate relationship when it comes to lightning for me and I’m sure most other photogs out there doing the same thing. You drive far and fast to get in a spot to get some shots off, and then the storm dies. Or the lightning is enveloped in clouds and just doesn’t hit the ground anywhere that you can see. It can be one of the most frustrating hobbies out there, but also fulfilling and intensely exciting.

These shots are not what I’d call my favorites. I definitely love cloud-to-ground strikes better, I like to get them up close if I can where they fill the entire frame.

However, what IS kind of fun about these shots are the way they explode from within this monstrous thunderstorm and create an amazing sight in the darkness. The images are fine, but standing there looking at this with my own eyes…you have this ominous cloud headed away, the city lights kind of set it aglow a bit, then you have lightning inside adding shadows, textures and depth.

My wife described it as synapses firing off inside a brain. That’s it perfectly.

I shot the first few of these on Gilbert Road just south of the Beeline Highway. I was set up there waiting for this storm moving 50mph+ to hit me. Well, it came at me just fine, but all the lightning was INSIDE the storm. Then it poured for a long time and finally it flew over me, so I got out of the car and starting snapping photos. The first couple are of the storm racing AWAY from me…the last few I drove NE a bit and got some shots from the side.

There was no way to keep up with this monster moving that fast, so I called it quits afterwards.

These next ones are further NE up the Beeline, shooting west-northwest at this fast moving storm.

Arizona monsoon lightning photos from August 28th

My daughter sat in her little car seat, enjoying Toy Story and staying safely away from any lightning or the bazillion numbers of mosquitos I encountered last night out in the Arizona desert. Probably was a little too close to a couple of canals out there, but at times it almost felt like a swarm of bugs attacking me. I definitely have more than five itchy bites on me today.

The above lightning strike was my favorite of the night. A tip to lightning photos out there (not that any of you would do this), if your car is running because you are keeping the AC on for your little girl, go ahead and do NOT put the tripod on your trunk…just use the ground. Subtle vibrations from the engine running caused a few of my shots to be a bit unsharp and I can’t tell you how bummed I was about that.

There is another one below I like that has the strike landing behind a cactus which created a beautiful silhouette.

While I was out, I met a guy who was trying his hand at lightning photography and while I stood there, I realized his own silhouette sitting on top of his SUV was kind of cool against the clouds over the city. Amazingly, I caught a shot of a lightning strike AND him, so I walked over, introduced myself and emailed him the photos today.

The last one is just him sitting there…watching. I just love it.

Hope you enjoy these!

Holy CRAP that was close!

(See below for the uncropped version)

Storms rolled into Phoenix from the southeast last night at a fairly fast clip. I was photographing some lightning off on the horizon to the northeast while waiting for the stuff south to hit us.

Once it finally arrived, it was quickly evident that if you wanted to stand outside your car with a tripod to photograph lightning, you’d better have a wetsuit and waterproof housing for your camera, not to mention a personal “windshield wiper” for your lens. There was just so much water, the levels of Precip Water in the Atmo (PWAT) were close to 2 inches I heard, and we received 1.22 inches at my house. That makes the third storm this year that we’ve gotten over an inch of rain.

So the photo above. Wow. I learned a secret from Shane Kirk about shooting lightning in pouring rain. You can do it from your dashboard with the windshield wipers on high. It’s not ideal, it may not work perfectly nor give you the most crisp shot of all time…but if you have no other choice, it can suffice.

This strike hit just under half a mile away from what I judged. Usually you know a bolt is close when you see the burnt orange “fire trails” that kind of fade away from a close strike. There was a little debate with my buddy Bryan about whether it hit right in front of that sign, but if you click on the large version, you can see the main, thicker part of the bolt stops at that hill and the rest of it is some kind of reflection in the rain.

The one bummer, if there is one, was that I was at 28mm for this shot when I should have been wide open at 17mm. Would have been even more amazing to see the upper levels of this bolt. Feel lucky to have captured this, the storm was essentially on top of me and I chose one direction to aim.

Here is the same shot straight out of the camera. A friend of mine, Brian Matiash, offered the idea of cropping the little left strike out, to see what it looks like and I have to admit, I like it better. But the original is below too!

This is most definitely the closest lightning strike I’ve caught on camera and you can be assured my heart skipped a beat!

First monsoon storm of the season

Yes, I am a happy camper tonight. When I left last week for Holland, all I heard was how that weekend was going to be a big one for the monsoons in the Phoenix area and I was going to miss out on the start of all the storm fun. Yeah, I know, I was going to the NETHERLANDS, so how could I be bummed about going and missing a few lightning shows?

Well…turns out nothing hit the Phoenix area really until tonight. And I was here to capture it. Luck spins my way one more time.

The shot above is one of my favorites from the night. The right bolt is glowing blue/green at the bottom because it hit an electrical box. You know when this happens because usually the lightning strike disappears but you see a bright explosion of light on the ground basically POP and then go away. The boxes in Phoenix used to be green so the glows could be an awesome green back in the day. I dunno if we still have those or not, maybe in the older areas.

A ton of fun out there tonight, I just sat in one place, two guys in a truck pulled up, whipped out chairs and watched along with me and there was much “ooohhing” and “ahhhhing” going on!

Lightning!

Last summer I realized I could photograph lightning with my little point and shoot camera. Downside was that it was a continuous shot mode, took 2-3 shots per second and you kind of had to be close for the camera to pick it up.

But I was hooked. Big time. I LOVED chasing storms and getting lightning shots. So I knew I needed a better camera, one that could do lots of cool things.

So I bought a Rebel DLSR. Most of you have seen how much I’ve used it since October or so. But as much fun as it has been, I couldn’t believe how long I had to wait until summer to get thunderstorms for lightning shots.

Surprise surprise…we had a nice little winter thunderstorm show last night and yes, I rushed out thanks to my buddy Tyler letting me know he saw some bolts lighting up the sky.

It was a fun storm chase for me, although it ended up with my Blackberry being slaughtered by my car and pouring rain. I stopped to shoot some photos and was in such a frenzy that my phone fell out of the car onto the rocks without me realizing. I left just as pouring rain and hail showed up (drove through some pretty dang good hail), and didn’t realize it was gone for over an hour.

After looking all over the car, I came back to the same spot and somehow spotted the red blinking light. Soaked with rain, scratched from me likely running over it, the phone was still ON, but nothing worked.

Ah the fun of storm chasing 🙂

Here are four shots from the night, the only four I really ended up with. The first three were shot from Higley and the 202, looking northeast. Amazing how high up this little corner was and how it almost looks like they were shot from a hilltop.

This last one below isn’t as good as the others, but I do love the rain you can see falling, while the lightning appears from out of the middle of it all.