Posts

Quinter Supercell

May 18th was a big storm day across western and southwestern Kansas…but we sat in one spot along an outflow boundary waiting hours for initiation and missed all kinds of storms going on, even a beast in SE Colorado…but finally near Park, KS a storm went up and we punched through the south side of it. At first it seemed to be headed north, but then it pulled off a nifty right turn as it latched on the boundary and headed into Quinter, which is where this shot was taken.

Not your typical stacked plates structure for a supercell, but it was stunning nonetheless and at one point seemed to have a funnel halfway to the ground. I never knew I caught a lightning bolt until scrolling through the time-lapse this morning! Lovely surprise!

Muleshoe

A new image from May 9th of last year near Muleshoe, TX. This was a beautiful supercell that earlier dropped a brief rope tornado near Sudan and then sped away so fast I couldn’t keep up with it. Here I am chasing it from the south side, trying super hard to keep up with it. I gave up after this though and just enjoyed watching the stunning structure and that monster tail cloud, along with some beautiful cloud-to-ground strikes!

Ocean of Fire

A stunning, out of control monsoon sunset west of Gila Bend near the Paloma Dairy

Back in 2015 west of Gila Bend, near the Paloma Dairy I saw one of the most extraordinary sunsets I’ve ever witnessed during the monsoon. Dust was blowing across the ground. The sky lit up in all shades of orange. Lightning in the distance. It was astounding.

Ended up being a beautiful time-lapse! But here’s a frame from that time-lapse, complete with a nice little lightning bolt to top off a gorgeous scene.

Perryton

Ohhhh if it had only been daytime, but dang this storm was awesome and definitely tops for structure I’ve seen at night so far this spring. We were on a line of storms right away when they began to intensify northwest of Perryton, Texas, and while we were watching them explode, the southern cell rapidly developed a rain free base. I could see striations forming as well, so we flew south about 10 minutes and I parked at this spot mainly to get those windmills in the frame.

This was from my 5D4 with the @Tamron 15-30mm, but the other camera was doing an 8K time-lapse of this beast and I cannot wait to render that. I don’t have a ton of footage this year yet, but what I do have has been pretty great for nighttime stuff. Looking forward to hopefully more action next week!

Ackerly

A gorgeous supercell slowly moves over the farmlands of Texas near the town of Ackerly.

Another image from May 31st when we were chasing marginal storms in west Texas hoping for something good and then a boundary collided with a storm near Lamesa and it exploded into a gorgeous supercell for about an hour.
This is near the town of Ackerly as it began to slowly die out, but not before it gave us some stunning lightning, structure and beautiful colors.

Erupt

An isolated supercell south of Paducah, Texas, explodes upwards in an eruption of cumulus.
Other than the Wynnewood tornado day, this isolated gem from June 14th south of Paducah, Texas was probably my favorite storm of the spring.

This is a frame from the time-lapse I shared in my film Vorticity. I had gotten on it earlier on the north side but I knew it was all wrong. The storm started moving more east/southeast, not northeast, so I bailed through some dirt roads and drove south until I got into a position where I though the storm was moving right towards me.

And boy did it. I sat here for around 50 minutes, which is a long time for me when I’m time-lapsing a storm. This beast was exploding upwards with such ferocity, it was incredible. During that entire 50 minutes, the storm never moved off course, it came directly at me and eventually right over my head.

There is nothing quite like an isolated storm. And the crepuscular rays were insane. Definitely a highlight of the spring!

Near Lamesa, Texas

Outflow boundaries collided near Lamesa, Texas and despite it being a marginal day, we ended up with a gorgeous supercell for about 40 minutes.

The third day of my Plains Chase Tour this spring was a marginal one, we woke up in Garden City on May 31st and by mid-afternoon we were in Lubbock chasing storms to our south. We got on one that was okay, but then a storm near Lamesa formed and we noticed an outflow boundary headed for it from the east. We hoped it would give it some extra juice and by the time we got down there, it certainly turned into a full-fledged gorgeous supercell for about an hour.

This was southeast of Lamesa and wow did it look stunning. All the dust churning underneath and the teethy low clouds on the left side. One of my favorite storms from this spring and all on a marginal day!

Near Ackerly, Texas

A gorgeous supercell hovers over the farmlands near Ackerly, Texas

May 31st was one of those days where you would have been happy to see just about anything. Marginal, not much hope…and we had woken up early in Garden City, KS and drove all the way to Lubbock, Texas just for a shot.

We got on one storm early, but as it died out, a southern storm near Lamesa was growing and an outflow boundary was headed right for it. Once they merged, the storm went full-blown supercell and it lasted for around an hour…such a treat on a day when we were worried we wouldn’t see much!

Waves

A shelf cloud passed over minutes before, leaving in its wake low hanging clouds that looked as if you were staring up at a crashing wave in the ocean.

A shelf cloud passed over this house minutes before, leaving in its wake low hanging clouds that looked like an ocean wave rolling over you from underwater. It was a stunning scene and the time-lapse of this shelf rolling over my position is pretty insane. Can’t wait to share it when my next film comes out later in June!

May 16th, 2016 near Spearman, TX

A tornado near Eva, Oklahoma

Sometimes you wish a road could have aqppeared from nowhere to get you a couple miles closer to a storm, with that view and that little tornado hanging out in the back. A great day...this was all captured on time-lapse, including two tornadoes, although they are tough to see...but it was a beautiful view.

Sometimes you wish a road could have aqppeared from nowhere to get you a couple miles closer to a storm, with that view and that little tornado hanging out in the back. A great day…this was all captured on time-lapse, including two tornadoes (one in this photo, one that drops a bit later), although they are tough to see…they are definitely there!
Near Eva, Oklahoma on April 15th, 2016.