Who holds the key?

My first thought when I saw this lock through the broken glass wasn’t what it should have been. There are at least two other aspects of this scene that are way more interesting than the question that went through my head at the time:

I wonder who has the key to the lock…or does anyone even know where it is anymore?

So now you may wonder, what are the other two things?

Both of them only occurred to me AFTER I embedded this photo tonight. Which means to me that I need to take my time more. But it kind of makes sense…because I found this abandoned water/power structure while on the way to Lake Mead while the sun was going down and I honestly was a little nervous being all alone. I was rushing to get shots quickly, composing fast, without really noticing what was around me.

Yet even during post-processing I didn’t see it. Not until now.

Okay, the first may not be a big deal, but the fact that the chain is going through the broken windows is kind of amusing to me. Obviously someone decided they needed to keep people out after they’ve tried to get in a few times.

The bigger thing is that the friggin’ door is OPEN. I mean, I don’t know how far I could have pulled it ajar…but maybe enough to get a camera slid inside to take a couple of brackets? Maybe it would still be too tight.

But the strange thing is that I just didn’t even notice.

Regardless of all that, I just loved this old door and I still can’t sing enough praises about using the 50mm on stuff like this. It’s just brilliant.

(exif: canon 5d mark ii, canon 50mm 1.4, f/2.0, iso 100)

  • http://scottwyden.com Scott

    I love the colors!

  • http://www.murphyz.co.uk murphyz

    Nice shot Mike; the first thing I noticed was the broken window with a chain going through. Since delving into Urbex my eye falls on any padlock, chain, hoarding, scaffold that I see and my mind immediately tries to find an access point to somewhere; I was lucky enough to walk past a place recently where the padlock was on, but not actually locked – result! My initial thoughts when seeing the above kind of scenes are not ‘who has the key’ but ‘what is behind there?’ and ‘how can I get in?’.

  • http://dudewithcamera.com Jesse

    Really like how the high key processing focuses your eye on the chain, great UrbEx work

  • http://www.stefanie-hoepner.de/blog Stefanie

    Great shot! Love the tones and the focus! My first thought was they broke the window in order to lock this place up…hmmm. 🙂 But the open door I didn’t notice either. How funny!

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  • http://www.myblueheaven.com Scott Wood

    I really love the image, but want to comment a little more about the taking a little more time aspect of the post. While I agree that taking time to make an image is important, taking meaning from what is in front of you and taking meaning from the final image should be two different things. I see something in this image because it is isolated down to the door and the lock. If I had been there to see the whole building, I would have taken something else entirely.

  • http://www.toadhollowphotography.com Toad Hollow Photography

    Absolutely great image & blog today Mike…. the image you present today is rather strange indeed! But this definitely makes for a really interesting photo subject.

  • Chris DeAngelis

    Cool shot Mike! I really like the brightness of the image contrasting with the rust and metal lock…

  • http://www.paradoxgraphics.net/ Chris Jones

    Interesting shot but I totally love the dof and color play